DIVORCE DO AND DON'T

Divorce Do’s and Don’ts

In modern society, your odds of getting married and staying that way are just about 50:50. This divorce rate means that there are many attorneys working for clients who want the best possible outcome from a parting of ways. Consequently, there are some crucial things to know about divorce and other family law matters.

A contested divorce can be costly

More often than not, the total cost associated with your divorce may be higher than you anticipated. Attorneys can provide advice about the numerous ways to limit the outward flow of cash before and during the divorce process. To that point—it’s critical to keep the process moving. Keep an open mind and focus on future opportunities rather than yesterday’s injustices.

You may have to accept some responsibility for the divorce

In a fault-based divorce, one spouse commits an act that provides legal justification for the ending of the marriage partnership. These acts can include cruelty, adultery, a felony conviction, or desertion. If you committed one of these acts, it might have a negative impact on you on specific aspects of the divorce, including child custody and property division, depending on local laws. It’s essential for you and your lawyer to be prepared for this scenario and to design sound defenses for them.

You’ll save money and emotional heartache by being organized

Be as organized as possible. Not only can you walk away from your marriage with a more favorable outcome, but you’ll probably save some money too. A simple way to do this is to start a divorce file. Keep every bit of paper or document that could affect how your divorce proceeds. Gather copies of all financial records and have access to all account information. You’re going to need it all, so keep it organized and easy to navigate.

You may have to accept some responsibility for the divorce

In a fault-based divorce, one spouse commits an act that provides legal justification for the ending of the marriage partnership. These acts can include cruelty, adultery, a felony conviction, or desertion. If you committed one of these acts, it might have a negative impact on you on specific aspects of the divorce, including child custody and property division, depending on local laws. It’s essential for you and your lawyer to be prepared for this scenario and to design sound defenses for them.

 

You’ll save money and emotional heartache by being organized

Be as organized as possible. Not only can you walk away from your marriage with a more favorable outcome, but you’ll probably save some money too. A simple way to do this is to start a divorce file. Keep every bit of paper or document that could affect how your divorce proceeds. Gather copies of all financial records and have access to all account information. You’re going to need it all, so keep it organized and easy to navigate.

It might be beneficial to come to an agreement with your spouse

While it may seem challenging, coming to an agreement with your marital partner can alleviate a lot of the expensive and time-consuming issues of divorce. Plus, it could also save a lot of emotional pain down the line. If you and your spouse have kids and friends in common, you will probably be in each other’s lives for years to come. Those interactions won’t be made easier if your highly contested and ugly divorce proceedings caused one another significant pain.  The divorce process should not be used for revenge or “sticking it” to your soon to be ex-spouse for something they did. Try to look past feelings of vengeance to work out a fair separation. If you and your spouse can work it out, you can each part ways without feeling resentful or taken advantage of by the other.

Hire an attorney for a contested divorce

If you are navigating a contested divorce, you will likely not see a favorable outcome without hiring a divorce or family law attorney. If your divorce is uncontested, and both spouses are in agreement about the critical details, you may still be best served by retaining an attorney to navigate the paperwork and court procedures. 

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